Holy Women Icons Project
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Books

Rev. Dr. Angela Yarber’s writing addresses the intersections among gender/sexuality, religion/spirituality, and the arts. She is a regular contributor to Feminism and Religion and Believe Out Loud, and a full list of her publications can be found on her curriculum vitae.

Holy Women Icons features full-color images of nearly fifty Holy Women Icon paintings. Each image is accompanied by an essay describing the woman portrayed.

 

 
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The Gendered Pulpit: Sex, Body, and Desire in Preaching in Worship explores the roles of gender, sexuality, and the body in preaching and worship. Chapters are dedicated to gender, sexuality, the body affirmed, and the body gone awry.

 

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Embodying the Feminine in the Dances of the World's Religions records the history, theory, and praxis related to four dances from four different spiritual traditions: Bharatanatyam, the kabuki onnagata, whirling dervishes, and Israeli folk dance.

 

 

Holy Women Icons Contemplative Coloring Book includes nearly fifty line drawings of Holy Women Icons, inviting readers to join the creative process by coloring these revolutionary women. The back of the book includes a brief description of each woman, along with a small color image of each original painting.

 
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Tearing Open the Heavens features Rev. Dr. Angela Yarber’s sermons from lectionary cycle B.

Microaggressions in Ministry views microaggressions through the lens of ministerial practice. Microaggressions—subtle and often unintentional slights, insults, and indignities experienced by persons of varied minority statuses—occur on a regular basis in education, the workplace, and daily life. Drawing from our background as ordained clergy, Cody Sanders and I address microaggressions directed at race, gender, and sexuality in church.

 
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Dance in Scripture: How Biblical Dancers Can Revolutionize Worship Today examines the dances of seven biblical figures: Miriam, Jephthah's daughter, David, the Shulamite, Judith, Salome, and Jesus. Each figure offers a virtue that has the potential to revolutionize worship today.